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Books Published by LBC Faculty
A Sincere and Teachable Heart: Self-Denying Virtue in British Intellectual Life, 1736-1859 book image
A Sincere and Teachable Heart: Self-Denying Virtue in British Intellectual Life, 1736-1859
In A Sincere and Teachable Heart: Self-Denying Virtue in British Intellectual Life, 1736-1859, Richard Bellon demonstrates that respectability and authority in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Britain were not grounded foremost in ideas or specialist skills but in the self-denying virtues of patience and humility. Three case studies clarify this relationship between intellectual standards and practical moral duty. The first shows that the Victorians adapted a universal conception of sainthood to the responsibilities specific to class, gender, social rank, and vocation. The second illustrates how these ideals of self-discipline achieved their form and cultural vigor by analyzing the eighteenth-century moral philosophy of Joseph Butler, John Wesley, Samuel Johnson, and William Paley. The final reinterprets conflict between the liberal Anglican Noetics and the conservative Oxford Movement as a clash over the means of developing habits of self-denial.
Pages: 277
Publisher: Brill
Date Published: November 2014
ISBN-13: 978-9004263369
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Handbook of Physics book image
Handbook of Physics
The "Handbook of Physics" is a complete desktop reference for scientists, engineers, and students. A veritable toolbox for everyday use in problem solving, homework, examinations, and practical applications of physics, it provides quick and easy access to a wealth of information including not only the fundamental formulas of physics but also a wide variety of experimental methods used in practice.
Pages: 1248
Publisher: Springer
Date Published: March 2002
ISBN-13: 978-0387952697
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The Subject of Race in American Science Fiction  book image
The Subject of Race in American Science Fiction
Using three primary authors, I discuss the evolution of racial subjectivity as constructed in American science fiction over the course of the twentieth century. Written during the first decade of the twentieth century, Edgar Rice Burroughs' Mars series exemplifies not only the multi-generic nature of early sf, but also a normative racial triangle of author, protagonist, and audience. Within this Anglo male triangle, a false universalism of perspective is constructed.
Pages: 240
Publisher: Routledge
Date Published: 2007
ISBN-13: 978-0415979016
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Vitushkins Conjecture for Removable Sets (Universitext) book image
Vitushkins Conjecture for Removable Sets (Universitext)
Vitushkin's conjecture, a special case of Painlevé's problem, states that a compact subset of the complex plane with finite linear Hausdorff measure is removable for bounded analytic functions if and only if it intersects every rectifiable curve in a set of zero arclength measure. Chapters 6-8 of this carefully written text present a major recent accomplishment of modern complex analysis, the affirmative resolution of this conjecture. Four of the five mathematicians whose work solved Vitushkin's conjecture have won the prestigious Salem Prize in analysis.
Pages: 272
Publisher: Springer
Date Published: August 1, 2010
ISBN-13: 978-1441967084
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A Tapestry of Values: An Introduction to Values in Science book image
A Tapestry of Values: An Introduction to Values in Science
The role of values in scientific research has become an important topic of discussion in both scholarly and popular debates. Pundits across the political spectrum worry that research on topics like climate change, evolutionary theory, vaccine safety, and genetically modified foods has become overly politicized. At the same time, it is clear that values play an important role in science by limiting unethical forms of research and by deciding what areas of research have the greatest relevance for society. Deciding how to distinguish legitimate and illegitimate influences of values in scientific research is a matter of vital importance. Recently, philosophers of science have written a great deal on this topic, but most of their work has been directed toward a scholarly audience. This book makes the contemporary philosophical literature on science and values accessible to a wide readership. It examines case studies from a variety of research areas, including climate science, anthropology, chemical risk assessment, ecology, neurobiology, biomedical research, and agriculture. These cases show that values have necessary roles to play in identifying research topics, choosing research questions, determining the aims of inquiry, responding to uncertainty, and deciding how to communicate information. Kevin Elliott focuses not just on describing roles for values but also on determining when their influences are actually appropriate. He emphasizes several conditions for incorporating values in a legitimate fashion, and highlights multiple strategies for fostering engagement between stakeholders so that value influences can be subjected to careful and critical scrutiny. This book makes the contemporary philosophical literature on science and values accessible to a wide readership. It examines case studies from a variety of research areas, including climate science, anthropology, chemical risk assessment, ecology, neurobiology, biomedical research, and agriculture. These cases show that values have necessary roles to play in identifying research topics, choosing research questions, determining the aims of inquiry, responding to uncertainty, and deciding how to communicate information.
Pages: 224
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Date Published: February 2017
ISBN-13: 9780190260811
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Is a Little Pollution Good for You? Incorporating Societal Values in Environmental Research book image
Is a Little Pollution Good for You? Incorporating Societal Values in Environmental Research
Could low-level exposure to polluting chemicals be analogous to exercise -- a beneficial source of stress that strengthens the body? Some scientists studying the phenomenon of hormesis (beneficial or stimulatory effects caused by low-dose exposure to toxic substances) claim that that this may be the case. Is A Little Pollution Good For You? critically examines the current evidence for hormesis. In the process, it highlights the range of methodological and interpretive judgments involved in environmental research: choices about what questions to ask and how to study them, decisions about how to categorize and describe new information, judgments about how to interpret and evaluate ambiguous evidence, and questions about how to formulate public policy in response to debated scientific findings. The book also uncovers the ways that interest groups with deep pockets attempt to influence these scientific judgments for their benefit. Several chapters suggest ways to counter these influences and incorporate a broader array of societal values in environmental research: (1) moving beyond conflict-of-interest policies to develop new ways of safeguarding academic research from potential biases; (2) creating deliberative forums in which multiple stakeholders can discuss the judgments involved in policy-relevant research; and (3) developing ethical guidelines that can assist scientific experts in disseminating debated and controversial phenomena to the public. Kevin C. Elliott illustrates these strategies in the hormesis case, as well as in two additional case studies involving contemporary environmental research: endocrine disruption and multiple chemical sensitivity. This book should be of interest to a wide variety of readers, including scientists, philosophers, policy makers, environmental ethicists and activists, research ethicists, industry leaders, and concerned citizens.
Pages: 264
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Date Published: March 2011
ISBN-13: 978-0199755622
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Keep Out of Reach of Children: Reye’s Syndrome, Aspirin, and the Politics of Public Health book image
Keep Out of Reach of Children: Reye’s Syndrome, Aspirin, and the Politics of Public Health
Reye’s syndrome, identified in 1963, was a debilitating, rare condition that typically afflicted healthy children just emerging from the flu or other minor illnesses. It began with vomiting, followed by confusion, coma, and in 50 percent of all cases, death. Survivors were often left with permanent liver or brain damage. Desperate, terrorized parents and doctors pursued dramatic, often ineffectual treatments. For over fifteen years, many inconclusive theories were posited as to its causes. The Centers for Disease Control dispatched its Epidemic Intelligence Service to investigate, culminating in a study that suggested a link to aspirin. Congress held hearings at which parents, researchers, and pharmaceutical executives testified. The result was a warning to parents and doctors to avoid pediatric use of aspirin, leading to the widespread substitution of alternative fever and pain reducers. But before a true cause was definitively established, Reye’s syndrome simply vanished.
Pages: 288
Publisher: Bellevue Literary Press
Date Published: February 2015
ISBN-13: 978-1934137888
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Vaccine: The Debate in Modern America book image
Vaccine: The Debate in Modern America
Since 1990, the number of mandated vaccines has increased dramatically. Today, a fully vaccinated child will have received nearly three dozen vaccinations between birth and age six. Along with the increase in number has come a growing wave of concern among parents about the unintended side effects of vaccines. In Vaccine, Mark A. Largent explains the history of the debate and identifies issues that parents, pediatricians, politicians, and public health officials must address. Nearly 40% of American parents report that they delay or refuse a recommended vaccine for their children. Despite assurances from every mainstream scientific and medical institution, parents continue to be haunted by the question of whether vaccines cause autism. In response, health officials herald vaccines as both safe and vital to the public's health and put programs and regulations in place to encourage parents to follow the recommended vaccine schedule. For Largent, the vaccine-autism debate obscures a constellation of concerns held by many parents, including anxiety about the number of vaccines required (including some for diseases that children are unlikely ever to encounter), unhappiness about the rigorous schedule of vaccines during well-baby visits, and fear of potential side effects, some of them serious and even life-threatening. This book disentangles competing claims, opens the controversy for critical reflection, and provides recommendations for moving forward.
Pages: 232
Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
Date Published: 2012
ISBN-13: 978-1421406077
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Breeding Contempt: The History of Coerced Sterilization in the United States book image
Breeding Contempt: The History of Coerced Sterilization in the United States
Most closely associated with the Nazis and World War II atrocities, eugenics is sometimes described as a government-orchestrated breeding program, other times as a pseudo-science, and often as the first step leading to genocide. Less frequently it is recognized as a movement having links to the United States. But eugenics does have a history in this country, and Mark A. Largent tells that story by exploring one of its most disturbing aspects, the compulsory sterilization of more than 64,000 Americans. The book begins in the mid-nineteenth century, when American medical doctors began advocating the sterilization of citizens they deemed degenerate. By the turn of the twentieth century, physicians, biologists, and social scientists championed the cause, and lawmakers in two-thirds of the United States enacted laws that required the sterilization of various criminals, mental health patients, epileptics, and syphilitics. The movement lasted well into the latter half of the century, and Largent shows how even today the sentiments that motivated coerced sterilization persist as certain public figures advocate compulsory birth control—such as progesterone shots for male criminals or female welfare recipients—based on the same assumptions and motivations that had brought about thousands of coerced sterilizations decades ago.
Pages: 228
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
Date Published: 2008
ISBN-13: 978-0813541822
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Primates in the Real World: Escaping Primate Folklore and Creating Primate Science book image
Primates in the Real World: Escaping Primate Folklore and Creating Primate Science
The opening of this vital new book centers on a series of graves memorializing baboons killed near Amboseli National Park in Kenya in 2009--a stark image that emphasizes both the close emotional connection between primate researchers and their subjects and the intensely human qualities of the animals. Primates in the Real World goes on to trace primatology’s shift from short-term expeditions designed to help overcome centuries-old myths to the field’s arrival as a recognized science sustained by a complex web of international collaborations. Considering a series of pivotal episodes spanning the twentieth century, Georgina Montgomery shows how individuals both within and outside of the scientific community gradually liberated themselves from primate folklore to create primate science. Achieved largely through a movement from the lab to the field as the primary site of observation, this development reflected an urgent and ultimately extremely productive reassessment of what constitutes "natural" behavior for primates.
Pages: 176
Publisher: University of Virginia Press
Date Published: September 2015
ISBN-13: 978-0813937366
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Making Animal Meaning (The Animal Turn) book image
Making Animal Meaning (The Animal Turn)
An elucidating collection of ten original essays, Making Animal Meaning reconceptualizes methods for researching animal histories and rethinks the contingency of the human–animal relationship. The vibrant and diverse field of animal studies is detailed in these interdisciplinary discussions, which include voices from a broad range of scholars and have an extensive chronological and geographical reach. These exciting discourses capture the most compelling theoretical underpinnings of animal significance while exploring meaning–making through the study of specific spaces, species, and human–animal relations. A deeply thoughtful collection — vital to understanding central questions of agency, kinship, and animal consumption — these essays tackle the history and philosophy of constructing animal meaning.
Pages: 312
Publisher: Michigan State University Press
Date Published: December 2011
ISBN-13: 978-1611860160
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But Is It Science? The Philosophical Question in the Creation/Evolution Controversy,<br />Updated Edition book image
But Is It Science? The Philosophical Question in the Creation/Evolution Controversy,
Updated Edition
Updated Edition On December 20, 2005, a U.S. district court in Dover, Pennsylvania, ruled in Kitzmiller et al. v. Dover Area School Board that teaching Intelligent Design in public school biology classes violates the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment to the Constitution of the United States. The judge explained that Intelligent Design is not science and "cannot uncouple itself from its creationist, and thus religious, antecedents." This case was just the latest attempt by proponents of Intelligent Design or Creationism to undermine the teaching of evolution in high school biology classes. The emotionally charged controversy, which has been going on since the publication of Charles Darwin's Origin of Species, shows no sign of letting up.
Pages: 577
Publisher: Prometheus Books
Date Published: January 2009
ISBN-13: 978-1591025825
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Intelligent Design Creationism and Its Critics:<br />Philosophical, Theological, and Scientific Perspectives book image
Intelligent Design Creationism and Its Critics:
Philosophical, Theological, and Scientific Perspectives
The last decade saw the arrival of a new player in the creation/evolution debate--the intelligent design creationism (IDC) movement, whose strategy is to act as "the wedge" to overturn Darwinism and scientific naturalism. This anthology of writings by prominent creationists and their critics focuses on what is novel about the new movement. It serves as a companion to Robert Pennock’s Tower of Babel, in which he criticizes the wedge movement, as well as other new varieties of creationism. The book contains articles previously published in specialized, hard-to-find journals, as well as new contributions. Each section contains introductory background information, articles by influential creationists and their critics, and in some cases responses by the creationists.
Pages: 825
Publisher: The MIT Press
Date Published: December 2001
ISBN-13: 978-0262162043
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Tower of Babel: The Evidence against the New Creationism book image
Tower of Babel: The Evidence against the New Creationism
The face of creationism has been through some major plastic surgery in the past decade or so. The leading proponents of "intelligent design theory" have left the ranting flat-earth types behind and found respected positions in the academic world from which to launch attacks on mainstream science. Philosopher of science Robert T. Pennock has explored all sides of the ongoing debate, which remains (despite the protestations of many creationists) more about biblical inerrancy than scientific evidence.
Pages: 440
Publisher: The MIT Press
Date Published: March 1999
ISBN-13: 978-0262661652
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College Students and Faculty in the Residential College Environment book image
College Students and Faculty in the Residential College Environment
There is a widening trend in developing smaller, more personal living-learning environments within large research universities. This study examines the development of college students as an outcome of out-of-class interaction with their faculty within the designed residential college environment.
Pages: 148
Publisher: VDM Verlag
Date Published: June 2009
ISBN-13: 978-3639170542
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Jesuit Science and the End of Nature’s Secrets book image
Jesuit Science and the End of Nature’s Secrets
Jesuit Science and the End of Nature’s Secrets explores how several prominent Jesuit naturalists - including Niccolò Cabeo, Athanasius Kircher, and Gaspar Schott - tackled the problem of occult or insensible causation in the seventeenth century. The search for hidden causes lay at the heart of the early modern study of nature, and included phenomena such as the activity of the magnet, the marvelous powers ascribed to certain animals and plants, and the hidden, destructive forces churning in the depths of the Earth. While this was a project embraced by most early modern naturalists, however, the book demonstrates that the Jesuits were uniquely suited to the study of nature’s hidden secrets because of the complex methods of contemplation and meditation enshrined at the core of their spirituality. Divided into six chapters, the work documents how particular Jesuits sought to reveal and expose nature’s myriad secrets through an innovative blending of technology, imagery, and experiment. Moving beyond the conventional Aristotelianism mandated by the Society of Jesus, they set forth a vision of the world that made manifest the works of God as Creator, no matter how deeply hidden those works were. The book thus not only presents a narrative that challenges present-day assumptions about the role played by Catholic religious communities in the formation of modern science, but also captures the exuberance and inventiveness of the early modern study of nature.
Pages: 224
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing
Date Published: June 2015
ISBN-13: 978-1472449726
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Hiroshima/Nagasaki Beyond the Ocean book image
Hiroshima/Nagasaki Beyond the Ocean
What comes to mind when you see or hear the phrase “survivors of the bomb in North and South America”? Those who immediately equate the term “the bomb” with the nuclear destruction in Hiroshima and Nagasaki might feel puzzled by the phrase. To many of us, these Japanese cities, which suffered the first nuclear annihilation in history, ought to be set in opposition to America, not placed within it. The purpose of this book is to eliminate this seemingly unbridgeable distance between the ruined cities and the country that made and used the weapons against them—and to challenge the prevailing view that the only survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki are the Japanese. We want readers to see Hiroshima and Nagasaki as being beyond the Pacific Ocean, not circumscribed or separated by it. We hope that the stories and images in this book will bring readers to think about the impact of nuclear disaster, regardless of where it happens, and its consequences regardless of the nationality of the people whose lives are affected by the catastrophe.
Pages: 103
Publisher: Yururi Books
Date Published: July 2014
ISBN-13: 978-4905026372
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Private Practices: Harry Stack Sullivan, the Science of Homosexuality,<br />and American Liberalism book image
Private Practices: Harry Stack Sullivan, the Science of Homosexuality,
and American Liberalism
Private Practices examines the relationship between science, sexuality, gender, race, and culture in the making of modern America between 1920 and 1950, when contradictions among liberal intellectuals affected the rise of U.S. conservatism. Naoko Wake focuses on neo-Freudian, gay psychiatrist Harry Stack Sullivan, founder of the interpersonal theory of mental illness. She explores medical and social scientists' conflicted approach to homosexuality, particularly the views of scientists who themselves lived closeted lives.

Wake discovers that there was a gap--often dramatic, frequently subtle--between these scientists' "public" understanding of homosexuality (as a "disease") and their personal, private perception (which questioned such a stigmatizing view). This breach revealed a modern culture in which self-awareness and open-mindedness became traits of "mature" gender and sexual identities. Scientists considered individuals of society lacking these traits to be "immature," creating an unequal relationship between practitioners and their subjects. In assessing how these dynamics--the disparity between public and private views of homosexuality and the uneven relationship between scientists and their subjects--worked to shape each other, Private Practices highlights the limits of the scientific approach to subjectivity and illuminates its strange career--sexual subjectivity in particular--in modern U.S. culture.
Pages: 280
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
Date Published: March 2011
ISBN-13: 978-0813549583
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A Time to Dance, a Time to Die book image
A Time to Dance, a Time to Die:
The Extraordinary Story of the Dancing Plague of 1518
The true story of a wild dancing epidemic that brought death and fear to a 16th-century city, and the terrifying supernatural beliefs from which it arose.In July 1518 a terrifying and mysterious plague struck the medieval city of Strasbourg. Hundreds of men and women danced wildly, day after day, in the punishing summer heat. They did not want to dance, but could not stop. Throughout August and early September more and more were seized by the same terrible compulsion.
Pages: 256
Publisher: Icon Books Ltd
Date Published: September 2008
ISBN-13: 978-1848310216
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The Real Oliver Twist: Robert Blincoe: A Life that Illuminates a Violent Age book image
The Real Oliver Twist: Robert Blincoe: A Life that Illuminates a Violent Age
Robert Blincoe's political, personal and turbulent story illuminates the Dickensian age like never before. His life provides an outstanding example of courage and a refusal to be downtrodden.
Pages: 468
Publisher: Icon Books UK
Date Published: February 2007
ISBN-13: 978-1840467277
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Leaps in the Dark: The Making of Scientific Reputations book image
Leaps in the Dark: The Making of Scientific Reputations
In Leaps in the Dark, John Waller presents another collection of revelations from the world of science. He considers experiments in which the scientists' awareness was not perhaps as keen as they might have claimed in retrospect; he investigates the jealousy and opposition that scientific ideas can provoke; he celebrates the scientists who were wrong, but for very good reasons; and he demonstrates how national interest can affect scientists and their theories. The result is an entertaining and highly readable re-examination of scientific discoveries and reputations from the Renaissance to the twentieth century. The tales in Leaps in the Dark range across a wide historical field, from a seventeenth-century witch-finder, Joseph Glanvill, to Sir Robert Watson-Watt, the self-proclaimed 'Father of radar'. Each story underscores the rich, fascinating complexity of scientific discovery.
Pages: 300
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Date Published: December 2004
ISBN-13: 978-0192804846
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Einstein's Luck: The Truth Behind Some of the Greatest Scientific Discoveries book image
Einstein's Luck: The Truth Behind Some of the Greatest Scientific Discoveries
As John Waller shows in Einstein's Luck, many of our greatest scientists were less than honest about their experimental data. Some were not above using friends in high places to help get their ideas accepted. And some owe their immortality not to any unique discovery but to a combination of astonishing effrontery and their skills as self-promoters.

Here is a catalog of myths debunked and icons shattered. We discover that Louis Pasteur was not above suppressing "awkward" data when it didn't support the case he was making. We also learn that Arthur Eddington's famous experiment that "proved" Einstein's theory of relativity was fudged And while it is true that Alexander Fleming discovered penicillin by lucky accident, he played almost no role in the years of effort to convert penicillin into a usable drug.
Pages: 320
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Date Published: March 2004
ISBN-13: 978-0192805676
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Fabulous Science: Fact and Fiction in the History of Scientific Discovery book image
Fabulous Science: Fact and Fiction in the History of Scientific Discovery
The great biologist Louis Pasteur suppressed 'awkward' data because it didn't support the case he was making. John Snow, the 'first epidemiologist' was doing nothing others had not done before. Gregor Mendel, the supposed 'founder of genetics' never grasped the fundamental principles of 'Mendelian' genetics. Joseph Lister's famously clean hospital wards were actually notorious dirty. And Einstein's general relativity was only 'confirmed' in 1919 because an eminent British scientist cooked his figures. These are just some of the revelations explored in this book. Drawing on current history of science scholarship, "Fabulous Science" shows that many of our greatest heroes of science were less than honest about their experimental data and not above using friends in high places to help get their ideas accepted. It also reveals that the alleged revolutionaries of the history of science were often nothing of the sort.
Pages: 308
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Date Published: January 2004
ISBN-13: 978-0198609391
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The Discovery of the Germ:<br /> Twenty Years That Transformed The Way We Think About Disease book image
The Discovery of the Germ:
Twenty Years That Transformed The Way We Think About Disease
The discovery of the germ led to safe surgery, large-scale vaccination programs, dramatic improvements in hygiene and sanitation, and the pasteurization of dairy products. Above all, it set the stage for the emergence of antibiotic medicine. This book deals with the ideas and experiments of the giants of microbiology, Pasteur and Koch, as well as less-well known figures such as Casimir-Joseph Davaine and Max von Pettenkofer.
Pages: 200
Publisher: Columbia University Press
Date Published: October 2003
ISBN-13: 978-0231131506
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Fermilab: Physics, the Frontier, and Megascience  book image
Fermilab: Physics, the Frontier, and Megascience
Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, located in the western suburbs of Chicago, has stood at the frontier of high-energy physics for nearly forty years. Since 1972, when the laboratory’s original particle accelerator began producing the world’s highest-energy protons for research, the government-supported scientific facility has been home to numerous scientific breakthroughs, including the discoveries of the top and bottom quarks. Fermilab is the first history of this laboratory and of its powerful accelerators told from the point of view of the people who built and used them for scientific discovery.
Pages: 512
Publisher: University Of Chicago Press
Date Published: December 1, 2008
ISBN-13: 978-0226346236
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Critical Assembly: A Technical History of Los Alamos during the Oppenheimer Years,<br />1943-1945 book image
Critical Assembly: A Technical History of Los Alamos during the Oppenheimer Years,
1943-1945
This volume is a lucid and accurate history of the technical research that led to the first atomic bombs. The authors explore how the "critical assembly" of scientists, engineers, and military personnel at Los Alamos, responding to wartime deadlines, collaborated to create a new approach to large-scale research. The book opens with an introduction laying out major themes. After a synopsis of the prehistory of the bomb project, from the discovery of nuclear fission to the start of the Manhattan Engineer District, and an overview of the early materials program, the book examines the establishment of the Los Alamos Laboratory, the implosion and gun assembly programs, nuclear physics research, chemistry and metallurgy, explosives, uranium and plutonium development, confirmation of spontaneous fission in pile-produced plutonium, the thermonuclear bomb, critical assemblies, the Trinity test, and delivery of the combat weapons.
Pages: 528
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Date Published: February 2004 (pbk; orig. pub. 1993)
ISBN-13: 978-0521541176
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